The Coeur D’Alene Resort Golf Course is known to golfers around the world for its famous 14th Hole: The Floating Green. The floating green is unlike any other hole on any other golf course because it's actually floating in the water! It's known to test players of all skill levels.

Not only does the golf green float but it also moves and changes up its distance from the tee. It's the first and only island golf green in the world that does that. It is also the most expensive green ever built! The architects of the course themselves even believed it was a crazy and impossible idea but they eventually came up with an underwater cable system thar changes the position of the green every day.

Credit David R. via Yelp!

The floating green has the capability to move anywhere from 100 yards to 270 yards however, the standard tee is usually set somewhere between 140–170 yards depending on the day. Once you tee off, a Coast Guard certified captain takes you out the hole on a water taxi.

Don't be too upset with yourself if you miss the 15,000 square foot island green and land in the surrounding water hazard. 20,000 - 30,000 balls are fished out by divers each season. If you happen to par, you'll actually recieve a certificate!

While role #14 is certainly a challenge, the rest of the course is known to be a shorter course that is golfer-friendly. Add this one to your bucket list, golfers!

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