The first rattlesnake sighting has been reported in Richland.

According to a Facebook post, the Benton County Parks Department receives reports of one to two rattlesnake sightings a year. This recent sighting was on Badger (Skyline Trail).

Get our free mobile app

This is unusual but not extraordinary. We receive such a report or two in most years. Keep in mind, these snakes want to AVOID humans and human activity, so hanging out on or next to trails is probably not preferred for them. Visitors may also find rattlesnakes at Candy Mountain and Hover, and we have a healthy population at Horn Rapids Park.

When hiking with a dog, please be sure to keep the dog on a leash.

Canva
Canva
loading...

Rattlesnakes are generally not aggressive, however, will strike if provoked or threatened.

What should you do if you see or hear a rattlesnake?

If you encounter a snake while hiking, it's best to back away and wait for it to move away on its own. If you hear the warning rattle, move away quickly. Don't make any sudden movement toward the snake.

Canva
Canva
loading...

What should you do if bitten by a rattlesnake?

The most important thing to do is get to a medical facility as soon as possible. If you can't, call 911 for help. If your dog is bitten, it's important to get them to a veterinary clinic for treatment. The National Poison Control Center number is 800-222-1222.

About 8,000 people are bitten by poisonous snakes a year in the United States.

Of the 8,000 snakebite victims, about 5 result in fatalities.

Do you hike Badger or Candy Mountains often?

Canva
Canva
loading...

Consider wearing high-top hiking boots and long hiking pants. The most common place for a snake to strike is the ankle area.

WATCH OUT: These are the deadliest animals in the world

Hiking Trail Near Dayton Washington Provides Challenge

A hiking trail outside of Dayton Washington provided the perfect day trip and adventure outside of the Tri-Cities.

LOOK: Stunning animal photos from around the world

From grazing Tibetan antelope to migrating monarch butterflies, these 50 photos of wildlife around the world capture the staggering grace of the animal kingdom. The forthcoming gallery runs sequentially from air to land to water, and focuses on birds, land mammals, aquatic life, and insects as they work in pairs or groups, or sometimes all on their own.