The Benton County Mosquito Control is inviting you to rid yourself of old tires while disposing of them properly at an event known as a Tire Drive that is set for 8 hours, this Saturday morning, April 17, 2021, from 7:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at 4951 W. Van Giesen St. in West Richland. This event only happens once-a-year and the weekend weather forecast looks very promising for this get together.

Benton County Mosquito Control

The Richland Police Department said Code Enforcement Officers are often asked questions about what people can do to dispose of old tires. A tire recycling event like this is exactly what the rubber doctor ordered.

Besides the obvious recycling positives, maybe the most important aspect of this tire drive is the eradication of places that mosquitos absolutely LOVE to lay and hatch their eggs.

It's a staggering statistic, but did you know ONE female mosquito can produce THOUSANDS of eggs in ONE tire?

The Washington Department of Ecology has partnered with the Benton County Mosquito Control in the planning and roll out of this event.

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It is absolutely free to drop off your tires, there is a 20 tire maximum per person, the tires must be rimless, no tractor tires will be accepted, and you must show proof of residence as only people who live in the Benton County Mosquito Control District can take advantage of this one time only inn 2021 event.

The weather is predicted to be perfect for some spring cleaning, so why not take advantage of some tidy time which includes keeping your yard mosquito free, too.

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